Garden Plans February 2014

Today is February 17, 2014; and the month has been cold, snowy, and not at all conducive to early spring planting thus far. The first wave of plants could be planted any day:

In Zone 7b, Hardy Vegetables Can Be Planted Outside on February 15.

  • peas
  • lettuce – all types
  • spinach
  • broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale
  • kohlrabi
  • radishes
  • onions
  • turnips

I started peas indoors weeks ago.  They are still growing; and I plan to set all of them outside this week.  

I started Brussels sprouts and weeks inside about ago; and they are well up-I hope to set them outside this week, too.

Plans for the week:  Add soil on top of the rabbit pellets and hay areas of my garden.  Plant the remainder of the peas. turnips, and the Brussels Sprouts

Image

I have begun building a raised bed behind the garage, to the left of the house–in the area around which I have also built trellises.  The base of the raised  bed is just regular garden soil.  Above that, I have added rabbit pellets, hay, and newspaper [from changing the rabbit’s hutches].

Rabbit pellets are high in nitrogen content; and I’ll grow vegetables there that flourish in high nitrogen. I also throw ashes from the fireplace there.   Wood ashes increase the Potassium.

I also compost coffee grounds and vegetable waste there.

Asparagus
Apply 1.6 to 2.4 ounces of N per 100 square foot area in early spring as the asparagus emerges and again after the last harvest in June.

Beans
Use an inoculum of nitrogen-fixing bacteria–do not side-dress2 with N.

Broccoli
Side-dress with 4 ounces of N per 250 foot of row when plants are half grown.

Brussels sprouts
Apply one side-dress application of 4 ounces of N per 250 foot of row when plants are 12 inches tall. Water appropriately to keep the crop growing vigorously during the heat of summer.

Cabbage
Side-dress with 8 ounces of N per 250 foot row when plants are half grown.

Carrots and beets
Side-dress with 4 ounces of N per 250 foot of row, 4 to 6 weeks after planting. Do not apply fresh manure; misshapen roots may result.

Cauliflower
Side-dress with 4 ounces N per 250 foot row when plants are half grown.

Eggplant
Side-dress with 4 ounces of N per 250 foot of row when plants are half grown and again immediately after harvesting the first fruits.

Leafy Vegetables
Side-dress with 12 ounces (¾ pound) of N per 250 foot of row, 4 to 6 weeks after planting.

Onions
Apply 8 ounces (one-half pound) of N per 100 foot of row 3 weeks after planting. Repeat every two to three weeks until the necks start to soften.

Avoid applying N after bulbs begin to form as this can result in late maturity, large necks that are difficult to cure, soft onion bulbs, and overall poor storage quality.

Peas
Approximately 80% of the N requirement of peas comes from nitrogen fixation by Rhizobia. Apply one-half pound of N per 1000 square foot area at seeding if the soil test shows the N-NO3 level below 5 ppm. This will help ensure nitrogen deficiency does not occur before N fixation occurs. Rhizobia inoculation is strongly recommended.

Peppers
Apply 4 ounces of N per 250 foot of row after the first flush of peppers is set.

Potatoes
Apply 4 ounces of N per 250 foot row three times but no later than July 31st.

Sweet Corn
Apply 8 ounces of N per 250 foot row when plants have 8 to 10 leaves.

Apply 3.2 ounces (1/5 pound) of N per 250 foot row when silks first appear.

Tomatoes
Apply 4 ounces of N per 250 foot of row in midseason.

Vine Crops
–melons, pumpkins, squash, cucumbers, etc. When the plants begin to vine, in midseason, apply a side-dressing of 2.5 ounces of N for each 250 feet of row.http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/garden/07247.html

Planting Basics: when and how to plant vegetables

The basic soil requirements for plants to grow and produce fruit are Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K). The relative amounts of these elements is listed on most bags of fertilizer and soil amendments.

Nitrogen is essential for vigorous stem and leaf growth. Sources of Nitrogen are manure, bloodmeal, bonemeal, canola meal, cottonseed meal and others.
Phosphorous is essential for strong root systems and flowering. It can increase fruit development and seed yield. Sources of Phosphorous are rock phosphate, bloodmeal, bonemeal, cottonseed meal, and urine.
Potassium is essential for cell division and strong stems. It helps fight disease, improve the quality of fruit, and decrease the water requirement of plants. Sources of Potassium are wood ashes, greensand, manure, and compost.

http://eartheasy.com/grow_backyard_vegetable_garden_02.html

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