English Lavender Varieties

EnglishLavender

  • English Lavender

    “English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is the most widely grown type of lavender in North America because it doesn’t mind humidity and winter moisture as much as other lavenders. It’s also the most commonly used in cooking and baking, and has a sweet, soft fragrance. English lavender, like all lavender varieties, does best in full sun and well-drained soil. The plants don’t tolerate wet or especially heavy soil.

    “Note: English lavender isn’t from England. It picked up its common name because it’s the kind of lavender that grows best in that country’s climate. The plant is actually from the Mediterranean.

EnglishHidcote

  • It’s easy to fall in love with lavender — the plant features attractive foliage, beautiful flowers, and a great scent. Plus, it’s wonderfully resistant to drought, deer, and hungry bunnies. It’s perfect for a variety ofgarden styles, too — from Mediterranean to English cottage. The key to success is knowing which type is right for your yard. Check out some of our favorites.
  • Video: More on Lavender

    Watch our quick video to get more hints on growing this beautiful plant.

  • English Lavender

    English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is the most widely grown type of lavender in North America because it doesn’t mind humidity and winter moisture as much as other lavenders. It’s also the most commonly used in cooking and baking, and has a sweet, soft fragrance. English lavender, like all lavender varieties, does best in full sun and well-drained soil. The plants don’t tolerate wet or especially heavy soil.

    Note: English lavender isn’t from England. It picked up its common name because it’s the kind of lavender that grows best in that country’s climate. The plant is actually from the Mediterranean.

  • ‘Hidcote’ English Lavender

    One of the most popular lavenders around, ‘Hidcote’ supplies silvery foliage and dark purple-blue flowers from late spring to early summer. It’s a good choice for small gardens. Want another reason to love it? ‘Hidcote’ is one of the strongest-scented varieties.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote’

    Size: To 24 inches tall, 30 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

EnglishMunstead

  • It’s easy to fall in love with lavender — the plant features attractive foliage, beautiful flowers, and a great scent. Plus, it’s wonderfully resistant to drought, deer, and hungry bunnies. It’s perfect for a variety ofgarden styles, too — from Mediterranean to English cottage. The key to success is knowing which type is right for your yard. Check out some of our favorites.
  • Video: More on Lavender

    Watch our quick video to get more hints on growing this beautiful plant.

  • English Lavender

    English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is the most widely grown type of lavender in North America because it doesn’t mind humidity and winter moisture as much as other lavenders. It’s also the most commonly used in cooking and baking, and has a sweet, soft fragrance. English lavender, like all lavender varieties, does best in full sun and well-drained soil. The plants don’t tolerate wet or especially heavy soil.

    Note: English lavender isn’t from England. It picked up its common name because it’s the kind of lavender that grows best in that country’s climate. The plant is actually from the Mediterranean.

  • ‘Hidcote’ English Lavender

    One of the most popular lavenders around, ‘Hidcote’ supplies silvery foliage and dark purple-blue flowers from late spring to early summer. It’s a good choice for small gardens. Want another reason to love it? ‘Hidcote’ is one of the strongest-scented varieties.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote’

    Size: To 24 inches tall, 30 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

  • ‘Munstead’ English Lavender

    Many gardeners call ‘Munstead’ their favorite lavender because the plant is quite compact, displays violet-purple flowers in mid- to late spring, and shows off attractive silvery foliage. Like ‘Hidcote’, it’s known for its strong fragrance.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Munstead’

    Size: To 18 inches tall, 24 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

EnglishGraves

  • It’s easy to fall in love with lavender — the plant features attractive foliage, beautiful flowers, and a great scent. Plus, it’s wonderfully resistant to drought, deer, and hungry bunnies. It’s perfect for a variety ofgarden styles, too — from Mediterranean to English cottage. The key to success is knowing which type is right for your yard. Check out some of our favorites.
  • Video: More on Lavender

    Watch our quick video to get more hints on growing this beautiful plant.

  • English Lavender

    English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is the most widely grown type of lavender in North America because it doesn’t mind humidity and winter moisture as much as other lavenders. It’s also the most commonly used in cooking and baking, and has a sweet, soft fragrance. English lavender, like all lavender varieties, does best in full sun and well-drained soil. The plants don’t tolerate wet or especially heavy soil.

    Note: English lavender isn’t from England. It picked up its common name because it’s the kind of lavender that grows best in that country’s climate. The plant is actually from the Mediterranean.

  • ‘Hidcote’ English Lavender

    One of the most popular lavenders around, ‘Hidcote’ supplies silvery foliage and dark purple-blue flowers from late spring to early summer. It’s a good choice for small gardens. Want another reason to love it? ‘Hidcote’ is one of the strongest-scented varieties.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote’

    Size: To 24 inches tall, 30 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

  • ‘Munstead’ English Lavender

    Many gardeners call ‘Munstead’ their favorite lavender because the plant is quite compact, displays violet-purple flowers in mid- to late spring, and shows off attractive silvery foliage. Like ‘Hidcote’, it’s known for its strong fragrance.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Munstead’

    Size: To 18 inches tall, 24 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

  • ‘Graves’ English Lavender

    ‘Graves’ offers gardeners lovely, wonderfully fragrant lavender-blue flowers in late spring and early summer. It’s a heavy bloomer and grows a little taller than many of the other common English lavenders.

    Note: If you have clay soil, amend it with an abundance of compost or another form of organic matter before planting ‘Graves’ or other types of lavenders.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Graves’

    Size: To 36 inches tall, 30 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

EnglishPurpleBouquet

  • ‘Purple Bouquet’ English Lavender

    With long stems, silvery-green foliage, and flower heads packed with rich purple blooms in early summer, ‘Purple Bouquet’ is a top choice if you want to grow lavender for cutting fresh or drying.

    Note: Like all types of lavender, ‘Purple Bouquet’ likes to be on the dry side. Try growing it in raised beds or on mounds to increase drainage.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Purple Bouquet’

    Size: To 20 inches tall, 30 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

EnglishBettyBlue

Betty’s Blue’ English Lavender

This adaptable lavender stands out because of its habit: It grows in a decidedly rounded mound and produces large spikes of dark purple-blue flowers in late spring and early summer. ‘Betty’s Blue’ is a compact variety that shines when grown as a small hedge or in a knot garden.

Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Betty’s Blue’

Size: To 30 inches tall, 36 inches wide

Zones: 5-8

EnglishRoyalPurple

  • It’s easy to fall in love with lavender — the plant features attractive foliage, beautiful flowers, and a great scent. Plus, it’s wonderfully resistant to drought, deer, and hungry bunnies. It’s perfect for a variety ofgarden styles, too — from Mediterranean to English cottage. The key to success is knowing which type is right for your yard. Check out some of our favorites.
  • Video: More on Lavender

    Watch our quick video to get more hints on growing this beautiful plant.

  • English Lavender

    English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is the most widely grown type of lavender in North America because it doesn’t mind humidity and winter moisture as much as other lavenders. It’s also the most commonly used in cooking and baking, and has a sweet, soft fragrance. English lavender, like all lavender varieties, does best in full sun and well-drained soil. The plants don’t tolerate wet or especially heavy soil.

    Note: English lavender isn’t from England. It picked up its common name because it’s the kind of lavender that grows best in that country’s climate. The plant is actually from the Mediterranean.

  • ‘Hidcote’ English Lavender

    One of the most popular lavenders around, ‘Hidcote’ supplies silvery foliage and dark purple-blue flowers from late spring to early summer. It’s a good choice for small gardens. Want another reason to love it? ‘Hidcote’ is one of the strongest-scented varieties.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote’

    Size: To 24 inches tall, 30 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

  • ‘Munstead’ English Lavender

    Many gardeners call ‘Munstead’ their favorite lavender because the plant is quite compact, displays violet-purple flowers in mid- to late spring, and shows off attractive silvery foliage. Like ‘Hidcote’, it’s known for its strong fragrance.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Munstead’

    Size: To 18 inches tall, 24 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

  • ‘Graves’ English Lavender

    ‘Graves’ offers gardeners lovely, wonderfully fragrant lavender-blue flowers in late spring and early summer. It’s a heavy bloomer and grows a little taller than many of the other common English lavenders.

    Note: If you have clay soil, amend it with an abundance of compost or another form of organic matter before planting ‘Graves’ or other types of lavenders.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Graves’

    Size: To 36 inches tall, 30 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

  • ‘Purple Bouquet’ English Lavender

    With long stems, silvery-green foliage, and flower heads packed with rich purple blooms in early summer, ‘Purple Bouquet’ is a top choice if you want to grow lavender for cutting fresh or drying.

    Note: Like all types of lavender, ‘Purple Bouquet’ likes to be on the dry side. Try growing it in raised beds or on mounds to increase drainage.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Purple Bouquet’

    Size: To 20 inches tall, 30 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

  • ‘Betty’s Blue’ English Lavender

    This adaptable lavender stands out because of its habit: It grows in a decidedly rounded mound and produces large spikes of dark purple-blue flowers in late spring and early summer. ‘Betty’s Blue’ is a compact variety that shines when grown as a small hedge or in a knot garden.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Betty’s Blue’

    Size: To 30 inches tall, 36 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

  • ‘Royal Purple’ English Lavender

    Select ‘Royal Purple’ for its long early-summer stems of strongly scented purple flowers. This variety’s blooms hold their color well after drying. One of the larger English lavenders, you can grow ‘Royal Purple’ as a stunning low, informal hedge.

    Note: If you grow a lavender hedge and live in a moist or humid climate, leave space between plants so air flows freely. The plants will be more susceptible to disease if they’re too close.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Royal Purple’

    Size: To 32 inches tall, 36 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

EnglishBuenaVista

  • ‘Buena Vista’ English Lavender

    ‘Buena Vista’ is a choice variety that blooms twice a year — once in late spring and again in autumn with a few flower spikes appearing in between. It features bicolored purple and violet flowers.

    Note: If you grow ‘Buena Vista’ or other lavenders in containers, be sure the containers have several drainage holes for excess water to escape. Use a high-quality potting mix and amend it with sand, perlite, or other materials to increase drainage.

    Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Buena Vista’

    Size: To 28 inches tall, 36 inches wide

    Zones: 5-8

EnglishCroxtonsWild

‘Croxton’s Wild’ English Lavender

This selection is similar to the wild lavender that grows in the Mediterranean. ‘Croxton’s Wild’ shows off light violet and purple flowers in late spring and early summer and has a loose, open form.

Name: Lavandula angustifolia ‘Croxton’s Wild’

Size: To 24 inches tall, 36 inches wide

Zones: 5-8

Intermedia

Lavandin [intermedia]

Lavandins (Lavandula x intermedia), hybrids between English and spike lavender, tend to be taller than their English cousins. They also typically have lighter color, larger flowers on longer stems. Lavandins are commonly seen in fields across the Provence region of France where they’re grown for perfumes. They tolerate hot temperatures better than English lavenders, but they prefer to be kept drier.

Note: Lavandins need plenty of sun and dry or well-drained soil. Consider mulching them with gravel to help the soil dry out a little faster

intermediagrosso

‘Grosso’ Lavandin

  • Among the most widely grown of lavandins, ‘Grosso’ provides strongly scented rich purple flowers in midsummer and tends to bloom a second time in autumn. It’s a large variety that likes a lot of space but it makes a big impact. ‘Grosso’ is commonly grown in the lavender fields of France.Name: Lavandula x intermedia ‘Grosso’

    Size: To 36 inches tall and wide

    Zones: 6-8

intrmediaprovence

‘Provence’ Lavandin

‘Provence’ is a lovely selection that offers light lavender-blue flowers on narrow spikes in summer. It’s grown commercially for its oil, so you can be sure this will be one of the most fragrant lavenders in your garden. While strongly scented, its thin stems make ‘Provence’ a poor cut flower (though it is excellent for making lavender wands).

Name: Lavandula x intermedia ‘Provence’

Size: To 30 inches tall and 36 inches wide

Zones: 6

Spanish

  • Spanish Lavender

    Spanish lavender (Lavandula stoechas) varieties offer a totally different look than their cousins. The flower heads are often shorter but topped with attractive bracts that look like large petals. Spanish lavenders love hot weather and can’t withstand cold temperatures. They’re excellent for containers. [Zones 8-9]

http://www.bhg.com/gardening/flowers/perennials/gardeners-guide-to-lavender/#page=1

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